In Depth with Canon EOS Cameras-PART 5 of 6


In Part 5 of our six-part series on Canon Cinema EOS, David Leitner explores the wide variety of lens options that cinematographers enjoy for the C500, C300, C100, and 1D C cameras. There’s of course the universe of EF-mount lenses, not only DSLR but also Canon’s Cinema EOS primes and zooms. And PL versions of the C500 and C300 are compatible with Canon’s PL Cinema EOS zooms as well lenses from a broad range of third-party manufacturers such as Zeiss, Cooke, and Angenieux.

OLED TV–Game-changing screen technology


What is OLED TV? 

This Game-changing screen technology produces the best picture we’ve ever seen!

If you’re tuned in to new technology, you’ve probably at least heard of OLED, a new way to display images. It’s been hovering on the horizon for so long it was beginning to seem like a mirage, but the first large-screen OLED TVs are finally here, and they’re pretty impressive. OLED (pronounced “oh-led”) is the first truly new display technology since plasma and LCD arrived in the late ’90s. It’s a big step beyond both of those TV types — the closest thing we’ve seen to a perfect screen technology.

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OLED combines the best performance aspects of all the screen technologies        that have come before, and raises the bar for overall TV picture quality to a          new level. Even as other screen innovations like 4K are beginning to appear,          nothing else matches the “wow” factor of OLED.

How does OLED work?

OLED stands for Organic Light Emitting Diode, and it’s the organic part that is groundbreaking. Traditional light emitting diodes have been used in LED-LCD TVs for years — as the white backlight shining through a layer of LCD pixels and red, green, and blue filters. OLED screens use a completely different panel structure, with a series of organic (carbon–based) thin films forming the pixel layers. These pixel layers are sandwiched between transparent thin-film transistor layers, which contain the circuitry that supplies the tiny electrical currents that cause the pixels to light up.

The OLED pixel material itself is electroluminescent — self-illuminating — so there’s no need for a backlight, with all of its limitations. Since there’s no backlight, when electricity is switched off to a pixel, it turns completely off — goes black. This ability to display absolute black is a first for flat-panel TVs, and it enables OLED TVs to achieve virtually infinite picture contrast.

And how does OLED look?

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So, does OLED live up to the hype? Actually, it does. Images seem to pop off the screen with effortless clarity and vibrancy.

OLED pictures have the color accuracy and wide viewing angles of the best plasma TVs, plus the brightness and energy efficiency of an LCD. In addition to spectacular picture quality, OLED makes it possible to build TVs that are much thinner and lighter in weight than any previous TVs. LG’s 55″ OLED is only 1/4″ thick at its thinnest, and weighs just 38 lbs.!

Although OLED panels can be made flat like conventional LCD and plasma TVs, the first OLED TVs from Samsung and LG both feature screens that are gently curved, which creates an even more striking look. The curved screen also seems to reduce screen reflections a bit.

Samsung OLED HDTV

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The 55” KN55S9C uses Samsung’s “Real OLED” technology: red, green, and blue sub-pixels, with no color filters. This is a 3D TV with a difference: Samsung’s unique Multi View feature allows two people to watch different shows on the same screen at the same time!

LG OLED HDTV

LG’s 55” 55EA9800 is the world’s only THX® certified OLED TV. You get an accurate picture that’s as close as possible to what the studio intended. LG’s 4 Color Pixel technology adds a white sub-pixel to the conventional three colors to enhance both color range and brightness.

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These are the first OLED HDTVs available in the U.S., but based on their spectacular performance, it won’t be long before more OLED TVs begin to appear.

SpaceCoast AV Communications is a service disabled veteran and minority owned small business. They provide the audio visual products, technologies and integrated solutions that bring people together; allowing people to share ideas and thoughts through media rich communications and collaboration solutions. We bring the value of allowing people and organizations the ability focus on what they need to do, better, faster and more efficiently. Headquartered in Melbourne, FL, SpaceCoast AV has a wide range of experience providing client solutions that span distance education, state government, Federal/DOD, Fortune 1000, and SMB. For more information please contact SpaceCoast AV at www.spacecoastav.com or by calling 321-257-9700.

Thanks to our Partners in Technology, Crutchfield for specifications.

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU HEAR CRICKETS ON CONFERENCE CALLS


What to Do When You Hear Crickets on Conference Calls 
SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 @ 12:55 PM | BY CHRISTINA TODISCO

One of the most uncomfortable moments that can happen on a conference call is when you find yourself with someone who can’t keep the conversation going and, even more oddly, doesn’t mind the ‘sound of crickets’—no one speaks, just dead silence. That leaves you wondering whether what you said made sense, bored the others on the lines or was totally off base. Either way, it’s a lose-lose-lose situation. A lull in conversation can happen for a variety of reasons. Oftentimes, a person on the other end will be multitasking and will look for any break in the conversation to send an email, check his or her mobile device or complete an administrative task. Or, the silence could mean that an individual is simply waiting for you to talk. A caller might even mute their line and then forget to unmute before answering. In any case, it is poor etiquette to expect the people on the call to keep the conversation going—especially if you initiated the call.

Therefore, the key is to keep your participants engaged to avoid an awkward lapse in conversation. The best solution for this is to lay out your agenda ahead of time so that all parties involved know the planned schedule and you can seamlessly move from one point of interest to another during a lull. By letting the other parties know your exact intentions early on in the call, it can facilitate an easy flow and prevent a live communication breakdown.

A further step to avoiding this scenario is to pretend that you are engaging with an entire audience instead of just a few people. By actively filling lapses in conversation with talking points, it will prevent you from relying on the others for ideas. Your participants, in turn, will respect you for coming to the table with enough information to fill the void and for not wasting time.

But, at the end of the day, don’t be terribly bothered by silence. In fact, silence is often a good thing—meaning you struck chord with the person on the receiving end of the call. Now it’s your job to do the listening and to let them chime in.

Christina TodiscoChristina Todisco is a marketing manager at InterCall and has been in the conferencing industry since 2002. Christina currently provides product marketing support for InterCall’s audio services, reporting and invoice solutions and InterCall Online. When not working, Christina enjoys spending time with her husband, daughter, family and friends.

Posted at 12:55 PM in Conferencing Tips |

Scope of AV communications technology, Video Conferencing impacts Nation’s infrastructure


720px-US-NationalHighwayInstitute-Logo.svgMore than one in nine bridges in the United States is structurally deficient, meaning that they require significant maintenance, rehabilitation or replacement. We sometimes forget how important it is to ensure the safety of our bridges, especially when you consider that everyday, Americans take 260 million trips over structurally deficient bridges, according to a report from the Transportation for America Campaign.

The National Highway Institute (NHI) – an organization within   the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) – works to improve the performance of the transportation industry through training. To help ensure that the workforce responsible for the construction and maintenance of our roadways are properly trained, NHI has developed a three-dimensional, virtual bridge inspection computer-based training tool that has become a critical part of its renowned two-week bridge inspection training course.

The training program office at the NHI was recognized by the FGDLA for its innovative work to bring quality training to students nation-wide. Richard Barnaby, director of training at the NHI, was there to accept the Innovation Award, along with the Engility team led by Anthony “Tony” Prause.

The Polycom team sat down with Mr. Barnaby and Mr. Prause for an exclusive interview about the DOT’s distance learning initiative, and how video teleconferencing (VTC) has helped the department get ahead in the space.

Here is what they had to say:

DOTPublic Sector View: Congratulations on being honored with an Innovation Award. Can you give us a brief background as to what the DOT is trying to accomplish with distance learning technology?

Richard Barnaby: We’re trying to use new technologies to deliver [training] to the transportation workforce nationwide. We want to be efficient, effective, and we’re trying to make it immersive so the participants can benefit from it. Their skill sets can be enhanced thanks to the technology, which is what we’re looking to do.

We took a very technologically complex training course, which is safety inspection of in-service bridges, and through Engility – through Tony’s team – turned it into a training program with gaming quality simulations that involve more participation than a traditional video game.

We were able to make the training better, easier, and more fun for the students to ensure that they learn what they need to know.

Public Sector View: What has been the return on investment of the program for the DOT? How has it helped the department accomplish its mission?

Richard Barnaby: The ROI for an undertaking of this nature this can be measured by our total reach. Since going into distance learning, we’ve managed to double the number of people taking our training. We went from 15,000 to 33,000 individuals, and the number is even higher this year. Through the use of mobile learning, we’ve been able to expand our reach and it’s enhanced the quality of the training.

Road building and bridge building are nation wide, and the training that we provide needs to reach our entire audience. Our audience consists of states, various departments of transportation, and the private sector as well as the local sector, so our training has to be national to do its job.

Our mission is to provide highly technical training at a very high level, and distance learning is the way to go.

Public Sector View: What issues and trends are you seeing today in the distance learning space?

Anthony Prause: The biggest trend that I see is that organizations are looking for rapid development of distance learning products at a low cost, but also increasing requirements and higher training standards with respect to quality and capability. The needs of customers are adapting to economic issues and the advancement of technology to provide better training products to augment all types of training.

There used to be a saying “Good, fast, cheap, pick two.”  That’s no longer an option – being “better faster cheaper” is now becoming the minimum requirement.

 

for more information on Video Conferencing and Distance Learning applications and technologies, contact SpaceCoast AV Communications at 321-257-9700  or via email at info@spacecoastav.com