SpaceCoast AV Case Study #MG17-268-004


Residential Client Profile

20170925_094948Our residential client lives in Cocoa, FL.

The Residence was built in 2005 and is a two story pool house situated on a local horse farm.

They host family on friends frequently for family gatherings and parties.

A whole house audio system, television, DVD’s and CD’s are the main sources for entertainment at family gatherings.

Current Situation

The whole house audio system was built with the home in 2005. Whole house entertainment was being provided through audio and visual equipment dated from the early 2000’s. They use a microphone in the main room to broadcast the voice of the hosts through out the home for large home gatherings.

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As a result of the dated equipment, our client was not utilizing all of the resources available for home family entertainment. The system was too complicated for the home owner and was not using the over 300 music CD’s. In addition, the home owner would only use the music stations available on AT & T U-Verse channels.

 

 

Technical Situation

The client called in SpaceCoast AV Communications: The AV Experts to help her update and simplify the home entertainment systems. During our initial Site Survey, we discovered the many remote controls needed to operate the system. We also discovered the complexity of using the existing Audio Visual Receiver was a source of frustration for our client.

With two zones in the residence where music could be broadcast, the upstairs patio speakers were not working due to incorrect wiring.

They also had two HD displays that were not being used sitting in the living room, which the client wanted to use with minimal technical know how to program and turn on and off.

Solution

20170927_103655SpaceCoast AV Communications: The Audio Visual Experts, proposed the residence use updated routers and switches to update and solidify the home network and upgrade wireless network in order to increase strength of signal throughout the house.

 

For the audio system, we proposed the Yamaha Aventage Series A1070. It is a 7.2 channel AV WiFi Network Reciever providing 4K upscaling with Blutooth technology, AirPlay, Pandora, Rhapsody, Spitify, Sirius XM Internet Radio with an AV Controller App for android and IoS devices. With 2nd zone capability, HDMI switching and a wirelss Sub-woofer module, we were able to consolidate and update many of the existing pieces of equipment in the home.

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As part of the music sources, included were the Yamaha MusicCast, a 2 Terra bit Network storage device that holds the music from the 300+ CD’s, swhich we ripped digitaly, making them available on the home network.

 

A separate tuner was provided and two new outdoor  100 watts per channel speakers.

Control of the system and all components is provided with the next generation touch panel advanced network Controller. In addition, we proposed the use of a streaming network player, a network Multi-Zone amplifier, a 7” Graphical tabletop Color Touchscreen remote and base station; SpaceCoast AV also wrote the programming code and created the software drivers that allow for the simple one touch operation of the soution.

Additionally, we wall mounted three TV’s throughout the house, using client provided televisions already available.

Benefits

engaged!As a result, the client was able to eliminte four remote controls, and operate the entire home system, whether for watching television, listening to the radio, CD’s or streaming music, watching DVD’s or entertaining guests all over the property with the touch of a button on the touch screen tabletop remote.

Frustration with not knowing how to use her system has been eliminated. Strength of the client’s home wi-fi network is such that she does not have weak or “dead spots” around her home and is also able to control the solution from the comfort of her bedroom as well.

With the ability to expand the Total Control experience, the client has plans to add outdoor lighting  Control and other Home Automation and Home Control options to the new, simple to use, one touch solution.

We’ve been invited to Sunday dinner to share all of what we provided with her family too.

Products and Services Used

[List the products and services that your company used for the solution.

For this solution we used:

Luxul

Yamaha

Samsung

Sony

URC control

Polk speakers

LG

Cisco

About SpaceCoast AV Communications: The Audio Visual Experts

SpaceCoast AV is an Audio Visual Design and Integration Firm that designs, integrates and maintains  audio, video lighting and automation systems. AVE is your “go-to” experts when it comes to providing exceptional designs, equipment and installation for Best Home Theater/Cinema Systems, Home Network WiFi access points, Commercial Audio Visual and conference room design,  AV for Houses of  Worship and audio video furniture.  From the wireless to hardwired solution, we’ve experienced them all and we can help you every step of the way. No job is too small or too big for our knowledgeable staff. We’ve happily done it all for 10 years now!

 

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Non-Technical AV Presentation Issues Solved


when-youre-giving-a-presentation-and-you-click-on-the-2895876Have you ever launched full-swing into a great multimedia presentation, only to have the technology fail in the middle of your talk? Have you been left wondering, “Why won’t my video play?” or “Why won’t my file open properly on this computer?” We know we can’t always be there to help, so we’ve developed this guide with our best tips to help you make sure your own presentations go off without a hitch.

You’re prepared for your big presentation, with backups in hand, but what do you do if you encounter problems at setup, and don’t know how to fix them?

The biggest mistake you can make is to assume that everything will work just the way you expect it to. Computers are fickle. Our number one tip is to test all the technology you’ll be using in the venue in the exact configuration you’ll be using it at the event. This “dress rehearsal” will help you find any technical bugs, and will help you feel confident that your event will go as planned. After rehearsing, you can focus on giving a killer presentation and feel confident that all your technology will work as planned.

Here are our top tech tips for presentation problem solving:

Before you leave the office

  • If you are sending your slides ahead by email, bcc your personal email address to make sure the attachment comes through ok.
  • If bringing your slides on a USB disk, use a USB drive that has nothing else on it. You don’t want the AV tech to go through all your personal files looking for the right presentation.
  • Always have a backup copy of your presentation in Dropbox or another cloud storage sites, and/or in your email, just in case your USB drive gets lost or corrupted.
  • Bring your own computer and any adapters you will need in case the conference-provided computer will not work. Make sure you have adapters to VGA, DVI, and HDMI, as different venues may require different connections.
  • If your presentations have audio, verify with conference organizers that an audio connection will be available for your presentation room – often that will not be hooked up unless you ask for it specifically.
  • Avoid relying on online content. If you really need an Internet connection for your presentation, make sure you specifically request it on the presentation computer. Try to bring offline copies of any material you need.
  • If live Web content is critical to your presentation, and you cannot bring an offline backup, bring a mobile hotspot, or a cell phone with tethering enabled, just in case.
  • When you communicate with event organizers, specify if you need Presentation View (with your notes) or if you need a Mirrored desktop. Most computers can be set up either way, but the event’s AV team will need to know in advance to set that up.
  • If you have complex graphs in your presentation, save them as static images (.jpg or .png), in case the presentation computer does not render them correctly.
  • If you are using a Mac to create your PowerPoint slides, make sure you test your slides on a PC before you leave the office. Pay special attention to transitions, graphs and media files. You may not have the option to use a Mac onsite.
  • If you are using Keynote to make your slides, make sure that the organizers know you will need a Mac with that software to give your presentation. Make a backup of your slides as both a PDF and a PPT just in case. Test both on a PC before you arrive.

Dealing with Embedded Media

  • Videos and embedded media are involved in 90% of the presentation problems we deal with at events.
  • Make sure if you create a presentation with video or audio in PowerPoint, that you embed the files into the .pptx file, and don’t just link them to a file on your computer. That said, ALWAYS bring a backup copy of any embedded media, just in case it didn’t embed properly.
  • Make sure you have your video as an external file in more than one format. If it’s a .mov file it will most likely NOT play in PowerPoint on a PC and if it’s .wmv it will NOT play on a Mac.
  • If you are presenting on PowerPoint 2010 or 2011, make sure you have the media in Windows Media format for a PC or Quicktime format for a Mac.
  • If you are presenting on Microsoft Office 2013 or Office 365, bring the files in .mp4 format with H.264 encoding for best cross platform compatibility, but make sure to bring backups.
    • Copy the presentation and all its associated media onto the presentation computer – do not run it off a USB drive. If that comes unplugged or your drive fails, your media will not play.

Onsite

  • Load your slides at least two breaks before your talk. Do not expect to plug in your USB drive as you’re being introduced. TEST your presentation when you load your slides into their final destination.
  • If you have embedded media, load the slideshow and all associated media into its final location on the presentation PC before you test it. And once you test it, do not move it to another folder on the computer. The files may become unlinked.

As they say, an ounce of prevention is worth 10,000 embedded videos. Or something like that…

For AV hardware or integrated solutions contact us at SpaceCoast AV Communications

What’s the Point of HDMI?


TV-rear-panel

With HDMI, it’s about copy protection. But let’s first address that coax jack. The coaxial cable input on a TV’s back panel is provided to connect an antenna designed to pull in digital TV broadcasts. A tuner inside the TV then demodulates the signal, stripping audio/video from the radio frequency carrier. Next, the MPEG-compressed A/V stream is decoded so that your TV can display it.

With digital cable, the process is similar, except a different modulation method is used to convey signals over the cable TV system’s wired network to your cable box.

Once HD signals are decoded by your cable, satellite, or other-type receiver, the uncompressed video and audio gets routed to an HDMI output. Those signals are then encrypted using a DRM (Digital Rights Management) scheme called HDCP (High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection). For the source device to pass the signals, a handshake must occur with he receiving device. This process creates a secure digital connection that prevents any content from being copied.

 

 

Got a tech question for SpaceCoast Audio Visual? Email us at  ask_the_AV_Pros@scavcom.com

Trust–Don’t let it cost you.


Puma_Thinkstock_HomeRemember that big home project you were doing that turned out to be a disaster? Remember, the always faithful and trust worthy, “trusted advisor”? Was it the friend…mom…dad…or maybe the neighbor? It’s OK we’ve all done it and experienced the result.  If you don’t know much about cars, you ask a friend who does know a lot what his opinion is after you hear from the mechanic. It’s smart to get second opinions from people you trust, and it happens to us all of the time.

Miscommunication between you and the contractor can spell disaster for your home AV project. It usually surfaces late in the project where the client gets an idea or input from their “trusted advisor” and then presents it to the contractor. While a client may ask for a second opinion from a trusted advisor, SpaceCoast AV knows the products and processes better than anyone else and so, we assert and leverage our knowledge and expertise on your behalf.

A few great examples might look something like this:

You might insist on using some Amazon deal speaker your brother-in-law insists in the best thing since sliced bread, but when paired with the amp you’ve carefully selected and calibrated, it sounds like crap (maybe because it’s a crap speaker or maybe because it doesn’t pair well with the rest of the equipment). or you could purchase your own AVR, but it doesn’t play well with the HDBaseT extender you plan to use and a reliable signal becomes an issue. Maybe the neighbor has a Harmony remote and is ridiculing you for spending thousands on a universal remote, so now you’re insisting on a Harmony, with all of the risks of reliability and lack of discrete control that entails. Or the client is adamant about using an Apple Airport Extreme as their router. There goes the managed network and  remote access to troubleshoot. In the short term any of these things could save you a lot of money, but in the long run, it will cost you in service calls that didn’t need to happen.

SpaceCoast AV has been a trusted, knowledgeable and professional Audio Visual for residents, businesses and houses of worship in Brevard since 2008. When it comes to your money and time, turn to the AV integration company who knows the products and processes better than anyone else and leverage our knowledge and expertise for your next AV project.

Tips for Setting up Church, Classroom and Ministry Room Projectors, Part 4 of 4


Other Key Considerations

From 4K/Ultra High Definition (UHD), which is four times the projectortable380resolution of full HD, to XGA, there are quite a few resolutions to choose from.  A key consideration is how much HD video content you plan to show.

Remote management is helpful in a classroom environment, especially if there are several classrooms. With remote management, lamp-based projectors can be powered off using a program timer built into the control software in order to conserve bulb life.

Video picture quality varies a lot depending on make and model of the projector.  That is because scalar chips and video processors in the projectors are not created equally.  This is important because audience expectations are getting higher due to the amount of HD content available.

Top 10 Do’s and Don’ts

  1. Don’t try to get by with a “floating” projector that goes from room to room
  2. Don’t plan on turning out the lights. Dimly lit rooms, at times, reduce the audience’s attention.  The brightness of the projector needs to be high enough to overcome lighting
  3. Don’t worry about LCD versus DLP vs. laser phosphor vs. LED light engines – they all perform well
  4. Do assess whatever multimedia sources and computer sources your presenters will want to connect to the projectors, and map that to available connectors before buying a specific projector model
  5. Do talk to presenters about how they can integrate more multimedia to get them thinking about improving classroom techniques
  6. Do look for models with “eco-mode” that will conserve power and bulb life for lamp-based projectors
  7. Do select projectors that have the compatibility with newer video signal protocols and higher brightness to suit your evolving needs over time
  8. Do examine your mounting challenges prior to buying mounts and projectors
  9. Go with a good brand name – it will generally equate to longer product life and better product reliability
  10. Do ask an expert for advice about your unique circumstances

A Better Facility

Projectors have a big impact on the image your organization sends.  You want to make presentations a memorable experience for parishioners, guests and administrators.  There are many different options out there for hardware, and up-front planning is the best way to ensure you are happy with your selection.  If you follow these tips, you’ll be on your way to a noticeably better facility.

TIPS FOR SETTING UP YOUR PROJECTORS, PART 3


If you are running cables to the projector, you’ll need to consider the optimal location for the cable connectors to be available to users.  For example, the DVD player might be mounted in a cabinet and the cables will need to terminate there, but the instructor may need to connect a laptop from the front center of the room.  You might elect to run the cables inside the wall to a simple and neat wall-plate, or you could run a small electric raceway channel down the wall if you need a quicker solution (although that is probably less aesthetically pleasing).  Another alternative is a combination of wired devices and wireless access for presenters.projectortable380

Once you have planned for traditional analog/digital input connections from PCs, players, and other local multimedia devices, the next thing to consider is network connectivity for accessing network content and performing remote administration of the projector.

Not all projectors will be connected to the network, but there are some good reasons to do so.  If the projector is tied to a network, presentation files on a server or from a computer can be accessed in some cases through the projectors’ built-in access point. From an asset management standpoint, projectors can be remotely monitored and managed by an administrator in order to turn them on/off to extend the lamp life.

Often, in church facilities there is minimal existing network infrastructure, and running cable isn’t an attractive option.  In these instances, wireless projectors can have a lot of merit and can speed up the installation if your building is set up for Wi-Fi.  One final connection you will want to determine is the location of the power source for the projector.  Ideally, power can be tapped from electric boxes on the ceiling.

Brightness

Most people believe brightness specifications in the 2,000-5,000 lumen range are suitable for these types of room applications. However, this is not always the case. Sometimes these room environments will require more than 5,000 lumens of brightness to compensate for certain aspects of the space. For example, with larger screens, brighter ambient lighting, and longer throw distances, a brightness-range of 8,000 to 10,000 lumens and higher should be considered when selecting a projector.

Solid State Light Sources

Laser phosphor projectors, which use solid state light sources in lieu of lamps, are giving houses of worship new technology options for brightness and longevity. Their low-maintenance design makes them perfectly suited to classrooms, sanctuaries and boardrooms alike.  Lasers have a lifespan of about 20,000 hours – up to 10 times as long as traditional installation projectors using lamps. That means the laser projector in most applications will last well beyond 6 years (depends on the usage model), compared to projection lamps that may need to be replaced within 1-2 years.  That longevity adds up to big savings for budget-conscious environments. It also saves the time and manpower typically associated with projector maintenance.