Tips for Setting up Church, Classroom and Ministry Room Projectors


Choosing a projector model to suit your needs can be overwhelming; here are some key points to take into consideration as you make this important purchase.

Consider how far the screen will be from the projector, relative to the size of the screen.  In some cases, it makes sense to select a projector projectortable380with interchangeable zoom lenses (optional) for proper projector placement. Interchangeable lenses also affect image size from a particular throw distance.  The size and shape of the meeting room will help you decide.  Most manufacturers will state the image size range at specific “throw” distances to the wall, and that information is helpful as you plan.

Not all projectors are installed on a ceiling or wall. There are many users that place them on a cart to move them from room to room. Advances in technology have allowed manufacturers to design brighter projectors in a small cabinet size which makes this type of usage more favorable. For most customers, however, fixed mounting is much more preferable – for product security, less audible noise, and other logistical reasons.

In addition, ministry leaders change their entire approaches to presentations when projectors are always available to them in a fixed-mount configuration.  They can access materials, the Web and apps, annotate using interactive projectors/whiteboards, and capture images for later use.  The availability of affordable interactive technologies and apps are breathing new life into the ways that ministry leaders can share and highlight important information.  For example, DisplayNote Software, used in conjunction with an interactive projector, lets instructors, students and others present and share content across any device creating the ultimate collaborative environment; multiple people can annotate at the board or from a device, while sharing and saving for all those in attendance.

These techniques create a much more dynamic environment, keeping those attending services, classes or special events much more engaged.

Image and Screen Size

In many small to medium sized rooms, image sizes will fall into the range of 60 inches to 90 inches.  Medium to large sized rooms typically have screen sizes of 90 inches to 120 inches.

Generally, you can calculate optimal screen size by measuring the distance from the screen to the person furthest away.  That should be a ratio of no more than 4:1 – for example, if the furthest seat is 32 feet away, you would select an 8-foot viewable screen.

Connecting Video/Data Sources

You may have video/data sources that you want to show on the projector such as DVD players, laptops, tablets and other smart devices.  Common signal source connections can include composite video, s-video, component video, HDBaseT, DisplayPort, and HDMI with HDCP.

An established practice today is transferring data from a source to a projector using a network.  Some sources, such as HD video, are best sent via a cable because the bandwidth on wireless connections isn’t usually fast enough for good video quality.  But laptop images may work well via wireless and offer more ease-of-setup for the instructor.

 

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5 Steps for Organized AV Wiring


 

When it comes to AV wiring, the old axiom “out of sight, out of mind” wireapplies. We tend to forget about what we don’t wiresee. Take the “infrastructure” of your entertainment system.

 

When was the last time you thought twice about the cables that run between your TV, DVD/Blu-ray player, AV receiver, cable/satellite box, and whatever other components you may have? For most of us, it’s the last thing we think about – as long as everything is working properly. But the minute there’s a problem, all those wires suddenly take on a life of their own.

When faced with a glitch that requires you (or a professional) to check, replace, or upgrade a component and/or the cables connected to it, the last thing you want to see when you get on your knees and peer into the bowels of your AV cabinet, or crawl behind your AV rack, is a rat’s nest of tangled wires. Yet, for most of us, that’s exactly what we find – and it’s enough to make you scream.

Get Organized
Pros take a number of steps to avoid the panic that cable chaos can cause, starting with organization.

1. Choose the right AV furniture (and location).
When setting up (or overhauling) an entertainment system, the first step is to choose an AV cabinet or rack that makes it easy to access the “business end” of your gear as well as a location that lends itself to accessibility; if you can’t position the cabinet or rack so there’s some room behind it, you at least want to be able to pull it away from the wall without too much trouble.

It’s also worth looking for AV furniture that offers built-in cable management; things like cutouts and channels for cabling and built-in power strips can come in handy. And while you’re at it, choose a cabinet or rack that takes ventilation into account (not all do). Bottom line: You want to be able to get behind your gear without becoming a contortionist.

2. Create a plan.
Take the time to map out the best position for your components and, more important, where the cables protruding from them will go. For example, it doesn’t make sense to put your primary disc player on a bottom shelf. Put it where it’s easy to get to! Next, take the time to neatly arrange all cables and use stickers (or tape) to label where each one goes.

3. Keep cables tidy.
In addition to avoiding tangles (a.k.a. “black spaghetti”) use tie wraps or wire clamps to bundle cables (not too tight).
Each of these steps requires a little foresight and patience but the payoff will be huge when it’s time for a system upgrade or maintenance.

Cable Type and Integrity
Looking beyond the physical location of your component stack, here are a few other things to keep in mind.

4. Integrity of wire runs.
Snaking wires haphazardly through walls, ceilings and crawl spaces can lead to frayed cables, which can degrade or, worse yet, cut off signal transmission. A professional installer will make sure that holes drilled in joists and studs are not only large enough to accommodate the cable(s) passing through, but also smooth. Pulling wire through ragged holes can damage a cable’s protective outer jacket or the insulation that separates the conductors within.

5. Quality and type of wire.
It’s important to select the cables and connectors that are best suited for the task at hand. This means using cables that are sufficiently flexible and rugged, especially if they run through crawl spaces or exposed/semi-exposed areas; poor cable construction can lead to wear and tear that hinders signal transmission.

It also means using cables that have the appropriate insulation and electrical characteristics for the intended application. For example, for long speaker runs – say, from one side of a large room to the other – it’s important to use wire that’s thick enough to ensure signal integrity. Using too thin of a cable – the higher the “gauge,” the thinner the wire – can degrade the quality (and volume) of the sound; professional installers consider a variety of factors, including component type, speaker impedance, and more.

To learn more about the ins and outs of audio/video installation, consult a SpaceCoast AV professional. Click here to contact SpaceCoast AV for a in home consult at no charge.